From the Orchestra Library


We’re Not in Kansas, or Texas, Anymore

Posted in DSO Colleagues,Touring by kschnack on July 6, 2011
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One of the most important times in our Vail residency is when there is…….

A Day Off.

Did you think I was going to say “Rehearsals” or something? Silly you.

Now, I know we are here to work, and to do our work at the highest professional level. This is not a vacation, and no one in the organization sees it as such. All of us take this obligation and opportunity seriously. To well-represent the Dallas Symphony Orchestra whether on stage or off is an honor and we are proud to do it. I love it when someone who hasn’t heard the orchestra in a long time says “Wow, the orchestra sounded really good before but now it sounds phenomenal!” Or, “I think the DSO is highly under-rated; it should be mentioned in the same breath with the top orchestras.” I heard both of these comments in the past week and it was a great feeling. So, work hard we do. When we are in the middle of the performance schedule there is a rehearsal and concert each day of completely different repertoire, and we must transition from classics to pops and back again in a way that looks and sounds effortless. It is a difficult job, and takes a lot of concentration and stamina.

But here we are in the mountains and the cool, dry air — which, after coming from Dallas is a gift for which we are most thankful. This is what registered on the car dashboard as I went through Wichita Falls on my way here last week:

June 28 temperature in Wichita Falls, Texas

A colleague who had driven up the day before said it was 116 in Childress when she went through. So, you can imagine the glee with which we embrace the change in environment and the fervor with which we plan our precious time off during the residency. We lug the hiking, camping and biking gear; we pore over trail guides and maps weeks in advance; if we are smart, we also get in shape beforehand so we don’t miss a chance to enjoy the surroundings.

When I saw this on the car dash two mornings ago, it made me smile:

Ahhh, relief!

We always have at least one day off during the residency, and usually two. The outdoor enthusiasts among us try to hit the ground running, literally, on that first day off so we have been known to push ourselves pretty hard in these mountains. Huffing and puffing in the thin air, and using muscles that haven’t been challenged in a while, we bag the summits, raft the rivers, bike the passes. Conditions right now are making things a little more difficult than usual though.

Gore Creek

This past winter and spring, Vail Mountain had a record snowfall of 525 inches, topping the previous 35-year record by some twenty inches. The result has been extremely high and fast creeks due to snow melt runoff. Trails that are open are muddy and slippery at best, or still snow covered (knee-deep) and impassable in places. And some of our favorite trails are closed.

Of course, all that extra snow makes for extremely gorgeous scenery and excellent subject matter for photography, another summer hobby for many in the orchestra. Although the pine bark beetle infestation has destroyed millions of acres of trees throughout the western and northern United States, the aspen trees and other vegetation seem to have benefited from the easier access to sunlight and additional moisture.

As with many music festivals, the location is a draw not only for the tourists and locals, but also for the musicians. It’s impossible not to be inspired by the surroundings. Music and mountains are an unbeatable combination in my opinion, and can only enhance the experience for performers and audiences. Some of the greatest symphonic music ever written is meant to depict the scenes and forces of nature.

One of the most stunning views up here is looking east from the Gerald R. Ford Ampitheater. When the concerts are over, between 7:30 and 8:00 each evening, the alpenglow over the peaks dares anyone to not stop and stare.

Can you blame us for wanting to get up there when we have the chance? I didn’t think so!

 

 

 

 


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