From the Orchestra Library


Yes, We are Geeks

Posted in Library Life,Library Supplies and Equipment by kschnack on July 1, 2011
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Okay, so every now and then we orchestra librarians admittedly get a little obsessive about our workplace tools. And we know it sounds ridiculous to outsiders who suspect we are geeks and nerds anyway.  I doubt most people would find much interest in comparisons of pencils, pens, erasers, tape, paper, correction tape, paper cutters, copiers, archival music boxes, rolling shelving, music trunks and folders.

Or wind clips.

Perhaps only an orchestra librarian can feel true passion about a good wind clip. I know I do.

Our stage manager needed to acquire some more clips for our Vail residency where performances take place in the Gerald R. Ford Ampitheater – a covered outdoor venue at 8,000 feet above sea level. Except the covering isn’t 100% and the wind and rain are definitely an issue. And because we are taking 100+ players this time for Mahler Symphony No. 6, we have to have 200+ functioning wind clips at the minimum (percussionists and players on the outside rim of the stage often need more than 2 per stand).

So it was for this reason that we found ourselves explaining the relative merits and demerits of the various wind clip options before the purchase was made. In the past we have ordered custom-made clips of very high quality for reasons which will shortly become apparent. Commercially available (and less expensive) clips usually don’t measure up and actually can become an impediment to the well-being of both the music and the players.

The more we got into our “research” the more we giggled about what we consider truly important in our world. One has to laugh about the absurd, and besides that, I was trying really hard not to think about all the details on our three pops programs – fifty or more pieces – that wouldn’t be rehearsed before we left town and for which there was no turning back once we did.

Therefore, I bring you…….The Wind Clip.

Evolution of the 20th Century Wind Clip

The clip on the far left is a mid-20th century representation, origin unknown. Note the spring mechanism and shape of plastic. This clip still works well.

The next two clips from the left are representations of custom-made clips circa 1990’s. You will see that there is now a real spring (which can be either too tight or too loose) and the clear plastic is shaped to start further away from the wood, gradually ending in very close contact. This is the most crucial element of a good clip. The distance between the plastic and wood allows the clip to secure a stack of parts and still lie flat on the page, so the player can read through the clear plastic. Which is the whole point.

That being said, the 3rd clip from the left has TOO much of a gap between the plastic and the wood, and so, if the spring is not tight enough, slides around on the edge of the stand and is easily flung off mid-turn when in a hurry. The looser clips also end up on the floor during stage set-ups and moves, which wastes a huge amount of time all the way around.

However, this clip has one really good feature the others don’t – a shorter wooden section on the top which means a longer clear plastic section, and so more area through which one can read notes.

The last clip on the right is a commercially-purchased one, all plastic with a very tight clear top, and it’s terrible. You can see what happens in the next photo.

Bad Early 21st Century Wind Clip against Still Life of Orange and Christmas Tree

I don’t even know what else to say about that. Except don’t buy them!

Of our four featured clips today, I would have to go with the 2nd from the left. It’s not perfect, but it works the best overall, and when dealing with the music for 100+ stands and 200+ clips, it can be counted on to do what it’s supposed to do.

Good custom made wind clip doing its job!

And that, my friends, is your very important library lesson for the day. As I post this, the orchestra is rehearsing the very piece in the photo above. Complete with clips keeping music in place through a gentle Colorado breeze.

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